Fermented

Delectable Solar Oven Peach Cobbler

This came out much better than I thought it would - the peaches kept their shape, the "gravy" was neither too thick nor too thin, the peaches didn't require peeling nor sweetener, and this recipe made delicious and generous servings for six people. The cobbler can be cooked in a regular oven, but you'd have to adjust the temperature and timing - maybe 350f would work, but don't cook it nearly as long (maybe 45 mins), and be careful not to let the bottom scorch. You probably wouldn't need to cover the pan in a regular oven, either.

Super Delicious, Light and Airy Gluten-Free Sourdough Drop Biscuits

I honestly didn't think these could be possible - light and airy, not gummy, no gums, with just a delicate, crunchy bottom crust. Plus, they're fermented! This is pretty much everything I was hoping for in a biscuit.

Start these the night before if you want to eat them for breakfast.

Makes 12 2.5-inch biscuits

170 g. (1 c.) white rice flour
28 g. (1/4 c.) tapioca starch
33g. (1/4 c.) potato starch
3/4 tsp. salt

1 c. boosted brown rice sourdough starter http://www.lifeisapalindrome.com/recipes/gluten-free-sourdough-starter
1 egg
1-2 T. water

Gluten-free Sourdough Egg Bread

When you google special-diet recipes, you realize that everybody's got different requirements. ("Hmmm...that fried chicken IS gluten-free, but it's definitely not vegetarian! Gotta get those search terms straight...") And googling Special Diets is what forces you become a Recipe Developer instead of merely a connoisseur.

Perfect Pear Pancakes (Gluten-Free)

Make enough for 4-5 hungry people

This is the easiest way to use up leftover gluten-free sourdough starter! Just feed the starter (and measure, to make sure you'll have the right amount in the morning) so that it's very thick (and for even better texture, make the last feeding tapioca flour, white rice flour, sweet rice flour, and/or other gluten-free flours - the starter doesn't like this for regular use, but if it's the final feeding-before-it-gets-eaten, it works just fine).

Sourdough Cassava Flatbread

I have recently discovered Otto's Naturals Cassava Flour http://www.ottosnaturals.com/ , a dangerous addition to a reformed special-diet baker's pantry... :)

These flatbreads are super yummy, satisfying a craving for both sourdough-bread-uneaten-over-the-past-six-years, and an infinitely versatile starch source that tastes good with most everything. You can split the breads open when they're still warm, if you want to try for a stuffed sandwich. I love that these aren't trying to be anything else - no binders, strange ingredients or flavors...just delicious.

Really Delicious, No-Pound, "Traditional" Raisin-Cinnamon Mochi

I have actually never eaten "traditional" mochi - but traditionally, when I was growing up, we bought flat cakes of Grainnaissance raisin-cinnamon mochi and baked it till it puffed up in the toaster. Such a delicious tradition!

Now we're eating rice again, but only if it's white or fermented (if it's brown). The folks at Grainnaissance confirmed that they don't ferment their rice, so I was determined to make my own mochi.

Fantastic, Delicious, Gluten-Free Sourdough Pizza!

In May/June 2014, Cooks Illustrated presented an in-depth article on "Gluten Free Pizza Worth Eating." I was very intrigued...but didn't want to use commercial baking yeast, and wanted to eliminate a couple of other questionable ingredients. Therefore, I created a prototype for a 24-hour-fermented, kefir-risen pizza crust. It was nearly unbelievable - you wouldn't even know it was gluten free unless someone told you, the texture was crispy-on-the-bottom and chewy, you could eat a slice with one hand (just like real pizza!) and I'm gonna keep experimenting...

Let me know what you think!

Hoppers

These are interesting Sri Lankan/India crepes, inspired by Sandor Katz' description in "The Art of Fermentation." Ideally, the edges are thin and beautifully crispy, while the centers are chewy and moist. My recipe is still in process; I'll post updates when I improve things. For now, the most important thing I've learned is that you absolutely must not use sticky rice - starchy white basmati is the best I've tried.

1 lb. white basmati rice, soaked overnight
2-4 c. coconut water
about 2 Tbsp. coconut water kefir, or some similar ferment, as starter

Delicious Dosas

I have been trying to add nutritious and delicious sources of high-quality starch to our diet. Dosas fit the bill, and they are also fermented. Plus, they are really delicious, especially when fried in lots of ghee!

3 c. white rice
1 c. red lentils
1/4 c. fenugreek seeds

Soak this overnight in water to cover; drain and rinse, and add just enough water to be able to blend till smooth (immersion blender works fine).

Fermented Spiced Apples

I got this lovely and simple recipe from someone on the Microbial Nutrition yahoo list; it's tasty, like crunchy apple pie filling. :)

7-8 lg. tart apples, cored/peeled/sliced into 1/4"x1" pieces
1/2 cup whey
2 T. pumpkin pie spice (about 4 tsp. cinnamon, 1.5 tsp. ginger, 1/4 tsp. nutmeg and 1/4 tsp. cloves)
1 tsp. vanilla extract

1 T. salt dissolved in 2 cups hot water, then cooled; more water to cover, as needed

Toss apples and spices together until thoroughly mixed; add whey and mix again.

Syndicate content